National Diabetes Week: Quiz

By HBF

4 minutes

01 July 2024

Woman stretching after exercise

With more than 1.9 million Australians living with diabetes1, it’s likely you know someone with the condition, whether it’s a friend, family member, colleague, or perhaps, yourself.

In July every year, Australia observes National Diabetes Week, which advocates increased awareness into the disease, including insight into its challenges and realities.

To help further foster awareness and education, we've put together a quiz to test your diabetes knowledge, and to hopefully provide a bit of education too!

Good luck!

Questions:

1. What is thought to be the most significant contributor to the development of type 1 diabetes?

a) Obesity

b) Genetic predisposition

c) Poor diet

d) Lack of exercise

2. Which of the following is not a typical symptom of diabetes?

a) Frequent urination

b) Increased thirst

c) Weight gain

d) Fatigue

3. Which hormone is responsible for lowering blood sugar levels?

a) Insulin

b) Estrogen

c) Testosterone

d) Cortisol

4. What is the medical term for a low blood sugar level?

a) Hyperglycaemia

b) Hypoglycaemia

c) Hyperinsulinemia

d) Glycosuria

5. What is the medical term for a high blood sugar level?

a) Hyperglycaemia

b) Hypoglycaemia

c) Hyperinsulinemia

d) Glycosuria

6. Which type of diabetes always requires insulin injections for survival?

a) Type 1 diabetes

b) Type 2 diabetes

c) Gestational diabetes

d) Pre-diabetes

7. What is the name for the tool used to measure blood sugar levels at home?

a) Glucose meter

b) Blood pressure cuff

c) Insulin pump

d) Syringe

8. Which of the following is a risk factor for developing type 2 diabetes?

a) Regular physical activity

b) Low body mass index (BMI)

c) High-fibre diet

d) High body mass index (BMI)

9. Diabetes is the fastest-growing chronic health condition in Australia. True or false?

a) True

b) False

10. What percentage of type 2 diabetes cases can diabetes prevention programs effectively prevent or delay?

a) 2%

b) 10%

c) 25%

d) 58%

Answers:

1. What is thought to be the most significant contributor to the development of type 1 diabetes?

b) Genetic predisposition

Type 1 diabetes is primarily caused by an autoimmune response where the body's immune system mistakenly attacks and destroys insulin-producing cells in the pancreas. While genetics play a significant role, environmental factors are also thought to trigger this autoimmune response.2

2. Which of the following is not a typical symptom of diabetes?

c) Weight gain

Despite being closely associated with type 2 diabetes, weight gain is not typically a symptom of diabetes. In fact, weight loss is a symptom of diabetes3, while weight gain can be a side effect of taking insulin4.

3. Which hormone is responsible for lowering blood sugar levels?

a) Insulin

Insulin is a hormone produced by the pancreas that helps lower blood sugar levels by facilitating the uptake of glucose from the bloodstream into cells, where it can be used for energy or stored for later use.5

4. What is the medical term for a low blood sugar level?

b) Hypoglycaemia

Hypoglycaemia occurs when blood sugar levels drop below normal levels, leading to symptoms such as shakiness, sweating, confusion, and, if severe, loss of consciousness. Hypoglycaemia is usually treated by consuming fast-acting carbohydrates to raise blood sugar levels quickly.6

5. What is the medical term for a high blood sugar level?

a) Hyperglycaemia

Hyperglycaemia refers to high blood sugar levels, symptoms of which include increased thirst, frequent urination, fatigue, blurred vision, and slow wound healing. If left untreated, hyperglycaemia can lead to more serious conditions such as diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) or hyperosmolar hyperglycaemic state (HHS).7

Management typically involves adjusting insulin or medication dosages, monitoring blood sugar levels closely, and making dietary and lifestyle changes to bring blood sugar levels back into the target range.8

6. Which type of diabetes always requires insulin injections for survival?

a) Type 1 diabetes

As we covered in question 1, type 1 diabetes is characterised by the body's inability to produce insulin. Therefore, individuals with type 1 diabetes require lifelong insulin therapy to survive. Insulin is typically administered via injections or an insulin pump.2

Type 2 diabetes, on the other hand, can often be managed effectively with lifestyle modifications, including diet and exercise.8

7. What is the name for the tool used to measure blood sugar levels at home?

a) Glucose meter

A glucose meter is a portable device used by people with diabetes to monitor their blood sugar levels at home or on the go. It requires a small blood sample, usually obtained by pricking the fingertip, which is then placed on a test strip inserted into the meter for analysis.9

Glucose levels can also be monitored by using a continuous glucose monitoring (CGM) or flash glucose monitoring (Flash GM) device. These devices measure glucose in the fluid between your cells instead of in your blood.9

8. Which of the following is a risk factor for developing type 2 diabetes?

d) High body mass index (BMI)

Being overweight increases the chances of developing type 2 diabetes seven-fold while being obese makes you 20 to 40 times more likely. Maintaining a healthy weight is the single most effective way to prevent type 2 diabetes.10

9. Diabetes is the fastest-growing chronic health condition in Australia. True or false?

a) True

Diabetes is the fastest-growing chronic health condition in Australia, surpassing both heart disease and cancer.1

10) What percentage of type 2 diabetes cases can diabetes prevention programs effectively prevent or delay?

d) 58%

Diabetes prevention programs can be effective in preventing or delaying up to 58% of type 2 diabetes cases. That’s more than 1 in every 2 cases!11 And, if you’ve been diagnosed, that’s where The COACH program comes in.

How The COACH Program can help you

Funded by HBF as part of your hospital cover*, The COACH Program aims to support your wellness journey after a diabetes diagnosis, enhancing overall well-being and minimising the risk of complications.

Tailored to your specific needs, each coaching session is designed to assist you in reaching your personal health goals. A team of qualified professionals provides practical advice, delivering reliable and easily understandable information to empower you in managing your health effectively.

Take control with The COACH Program

Take control of your health with our six-month telephone support program designed for chronic health conditions.

Request a call back

Sources:

1Diabetes Australia - Diabetes in Australia

2Diabetes Australia - Type 1 diabetes

3Better Health Channel - Diabetes

4National Diabetes Services Scheme - Benefits and side-effects of insulin

5The Clinical Biochemist Reviews - Insulin and Insulin Resistance

6Healthdirect - Hypoglycaemia (low blood sugar)

7Healthdirect - Hyperglycaemia (high blood sugar)

8Diabetes Australia:- Managing type 2 diabetes

9National Diabetes Services Scheme- Blood glucose monitoring

10Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health - Simple Steps to Preventing Diabetes

11Diabetes Australia - Prevention

Disclaimers:

*HBF health support programs are fully-covered for members who hold an eligible level of HBF hospital cover and meet the program eligibility criteria. Members may only participate in each HBF health support program once per lifetime.

This article contains general information only and does not take into account the health, personal situation or needs of any person. In conjunction with your GP or treating health care professional, please consider whether the information is suitable for you and your personal circumstances.